Stuck on the Language of

Are you great at math but the problems are challenging because of the words?

A Registered Psychologist and an educator with over 30 years of experience working with individuals with a variety of learning needs. She has taught at the junior and senior high school level and has been an educational consultant for the past 18 years. She is also an English as a Second Language specialist and has her TESOL Level 1 designation.

Over 30 years of experience and accomplishments with students and teachers in elementary, junior and high schools, teaching in the classroom as well as leading, guiding and instructional coaching in a variety of settings. She is an English As a Second Language Specialist, has her TESOL Level 1 designation and currently continues to enjoy teaching adults English at the University level.

Are you great at math but the problems are challenging because of the words?  

Look for tricky words that refer to: 

amounts (hardly, higher, last, least, less, longer, most, next, older, rarely, scarcely, younger) 

logic (alike, almost, always, because, different from, exactly, if, never, not quite, opposite of, probably, same, since, unless, whether)       

Rewrite the problem–Put the question first   

This will allow you to see what you are needing to solve. Also, remove extra or unnecessary words. Use simpler words. (circumference/distance around circle)  

Example: If Jarod types one page of his report on his computer in 22 minutes, how much time will it take him to type seven pages?  

Rewrite: How much time will it take to type 7 pages?  One page takes 22 minutes.  

Spend time to learn relationships between two words  

Examples like: “as old as” (same age); “older than”,  

divided by” and  “divided into” “as much as” “is shared among”  

Look out for common terms  

Take time to understand words that are used in and outside of math.  

“prime”, “term”, “root”, “table”, “mean”, “face”, “edge” 

Relate the problem to a real-world situation       

Try and relate the problem to entertainment, sports or games as this helps to make the learning more relevant to your real-life experiences.

Draw a diagram or use a table/chart  

Your journal allows you to practice and strength new language skills and terms. Use your native language beside the new words.  

Keep a word-problem journal

Your journal allows you to practice and strength new language skills and terms. Use your native language beside the new words.