Setting up Schedules and Routines After Breaks

Routines and schedules help to create patterns which helps to reduce anxiety and build a sense of security and trust.

B.Ed., MSc.
Sue has worked in schools and private practice as a teacher, system leader and Psychologist for over 35 years.

Why are schedules and routines* important for learning at home? The most important reason for schedules and routines is that they offer stability and consistency. After a long weekend, Winter or Spring Break, or summer holidays, it can be difficult to get back into a schedule and routine. Here are a few ways to help you ease yourself and your children back into the swing of things. 

*The terms schedules and routines are often used interchangeably but for our purposes in this post , we will think of a schedule as the big picture—main activities to be completed daily, and a routine as the steps to be done to complete the schedule.

Wait – Why Do I Need Schedules and Routines?

Routines and schedules help to create patterns which helps to reduce anxiety and build a sense of security and trust. It helps your child to relax when they know what is coming up next. Routines also help your child understand expectations and encourage a higher level of engagement and attention. 

Helpful Tips

When setting up your schedule or routine:

  • provide a balance of activities (reading, writing, math, science, history, art, gym etc.)
  • provide a variety of activities, organized in small chunks
  • build in breaks for relaxation, play and free time
  • consider the age, attention level and interests of your child
  • have a visual of the schedule so your child can see what each day will look like
  • go over the schedule and routine with your child once the break has ended
  • ask for your child’s input
  • be flexible and patient as you resume learning at home after a break
Sue Humphry
B.Ed., MSc. Sue has worked in schools and private practice as a teacher, system leader and Psychologist for over 35 years.