Let’s Get Creative

No matter what your personality type is, engaging in small, daily acts of creativity can make us feel good.

B.Ed, M..Ed
Registered Psychologist
I have worked in schools and private practice as a teacher and a School Psychologist for over 35 years.

Doing something creative can improve your brain health and overall sense of well-being. No matter what your personality type is, engaging in small, daily acts of creativity can make us feel good, not just in the moment, but over the long term according to the findings of an American and New Zealand research team who studied the creative activities of over 650 youth.

Repetitive creative motions like knitting, painting or writing can activate flow, a state where you are completely absorbed in something, which floods your brain with dopamine, the brain’s feel good chemical. Engaging in a creative activity is comparable to meditation for calming the brain and body. Even just gardening or sewing releases this natural anti-depressant.

Creative visual pursuits such as photography or painting can help manage emotions in a productive way when life’s experiences or stressors are too difficult to put into words.

People who play a musical instrument have better connection between their right and left brain which improves overall cognitive functioning.

Incorporating creativity into the everyday life, for ourselves and our children, whether it is learning a craft, taking up cooking or singing a made- up song, is an actionable item that we can all do to take charge of our wellness.

Deborah Hinds-Nunziata
B.Ed, M..Ed Registered Psychologist I have worked in schools and private practice as a teacher and a School Psychologist for over 35 years.