Exploring Long-Term Impacts of School Disruption – Webinar Replay

Will they make up any learning gaps? Will they experience trauma or unchecked anxiety?

With a doctorate in leadership, she has over thirty-five years’ experience as a school leader and psychologist and has held various school and system leadership positions including Deputy Superintendent of schools, psychologist, teacher, and counselor.

There have been multiple times in history when the education of children and youth have been disrupted, but never have so many students been impacted. Currently about 90% of the world’s children are not in school and parents and professionals are wondering about the potential long-term impacts. Will they make up any learning gaps? Will they experience trauma or unchecked anxiety? The messages from this webinar are encouraging. While potential gaps will vary with each individual child, teachers will meet students where they are at in their learning and assist them in moving forward. Past research indicates how positively student’s learning momentum continues when students return to school. The same can be said of their social/emotional trajectory. It is suggested that framing our myriad of experiences during this time from a grief and loss lens may be more helpful than viewing them as traumatic as it suggests that resilience can be expected. Certainly, more vulnerable students will be provided with extra support but all children will benefit from adults who remain calm and operate from a place of optimism and hope. Kids will follow our lead! Strong relationships between parents and teachers will help create safe and connected cultures where students will thrive and rebound quickly. In addition, we have learned some new ways of operating that may increase future opportunities for learning and providing specialized support

Kandace Jordan
With a doctorate in leadership, she has over thirty-five years’ experience as a school leader and psychologist and has held various school and system leadership positions including Deputy Superintendent of schools, psychologist, teacher, and counselor.